FYNE ALES REVEALS NEW LOOK AND FIRST CANNED BEERS

FYNE ALES REVEALS NEW LOOK AND FIRST CANNED BEERS

Independent Scottish brewery Fyne Ales has unveiled an updated brand identity and outlined plans to introduce new products to its core range, including two canned beers.

Fyne Ale’s new look, set to be rolled out in the coming weeks, draws inspiration from its farm brewery status and rural location on a 4500-acre estate at the head of Loch Fyne. Not only will the brewery’s current core range, including flagship pale ale Jarl, be updated, but three beers have been added to the Fyne Ales’ year-round brews.

From December 2018, the Argyll brewery’s Workbench, a 5.5% IPA, and Easy Trail, a 4.2% session IPA, will be available in 330ml cans, and North West, a New Zealand-hopped lager will join them as a permanent keg offering.

“Fyne Ales has always been recognised for the diversity and quality of our beers, but the look and feel of our brand put us at risk of falling behind in this fast-moving industry,” commented Fyne Ales managing director, Jamie Delap. “We set out to create a new identity that better tells the story of who we are and where we come from, but also reflects our ambitions as a modern, progressive brewery.”

Fyne Ales partnered with Glasgow brand and design consultants O Street for the project, working closely with them to create the new look – each beer features stylised textures created using photography from the brewery’s farm estate, chosen to help tell the story of the beer and brewery.

“We’re proud to be a farm brewery; being a working farm in such a historic, beautiful and isolated location is part of everyday life at Fyne Ales,” commented Fyne Ales marketing manager Iain Smith on the new designs. “O Street has created a unique, striking brand identity that celebrates our provenance and we can’t wait to showcase it across our core beers and introducing Workbench and Easy Trail cans.”

Fyne Ales, which launched its small-batch farmhouse and mixed fermentation brewing project, Origins Brewing, in 2017, believes the new, more rustic branding will appeal to its current followers and new drinkers alike. 

The brewery also revealed details of three bottled limited specials which will debut with the new branding – Remote Parts, a 7% West Coast IPA brewed in collaboration with Cigar City Brewery; Perfect Silence, a 6.9% red IPA and an 11.1% bourbon barrel-aged version of Brouwerij De Molen collaboration imperial stout, Mills & Hills. All three will be available in 330ml bottles later this month, with Remote Parts also available in keg and Perfect Silence in keg and cask.

The new beers and updated branding will be supported with an ongoing sales and marketing strategy designed to increase brand and product awareness and increase the availability of the brewery’s beers. Activity begins today, with the launch of a new Fyne Ales website.


Canadian Issue 1 free to read here

CANADIAN ISSUE 1 FREE TO READ HERE

 We’ve just launched our free, independent magazine in Canada. Read it all here. 

Illustration by Adam McNaught-Davis

Finally, Ontario Gets the Beer Publication it Deserves!

If you have seen fit to pick up this inaugural edition of Original Gravity, chances are that you have at least a passing familiarity with what’s been going on in beer in this city and province over the last several years. And if you don’t, or if you’d like to freshen that knowledge, Jordan St. John’s story on Toronto brewery taprooms, found on page 16, will go a long way to updating you.

The point being that beer in these parts has changed almost immeasurably over the past three decades, from just a small handful of breweries and brewpubs – anyone remember Upper Canada Brewing? How about Denison’s? – to 41 operating within the city limits and 250 scattered across the province, according to the latest numbers from the Ontario Beverage Network, which probably became out-of-date the day after we went to print, such is the pace of brewery expansion in 2018.

Yet beer literature, never much of a thing around Ontario, simply hasn’t kept up with developments. Until now, that is.

What you hold in your hands is a beer publication of a different ilk, one that seeks to challenge as much as it does entertain, to inform as well as to provoke. You will find beer reviews, of course – Greg Clow and I take on a quintet of brews on page 22 – as well as style features and profiles of the people who work hard to bring you great-tasting beer – both starting to the right. But you will also discover within the following pages things that you might not expect to find in a beer magazine, like Robin LeBlanc’s wrenching essay of loss and community on page 19 and our quirky spotlight on The Art of Beer on the page opposite this one.

In short, what we are aiming to bring you with Original Gravity is a magazine thatís as challenging, diverse, surprising, illuminating and captivating as is the Ontario beer market we cover. In other words, the kind of beer publication this province so richly deserves!

Stephen Beaumont, Editor-in-Chief

 

 


I Am A Brewer: Cask launches new canning machine

I AM A BREWER: Cask launches new canning machine

Cask Global Canning Solutions – the inventors of micro-canning equipment for craft brewers – has released another revolutionary canning line

 

NOTE: I AM A BREWER is Original Gravity’s brand that looks at industry news.

Cask Global Canning Solutions – the inventors of micro-canning equipment for craft brewers – has released a uniquely versatile canning line.

Cask’s new Micro-Automated Canning System (mACS) packages both carbonated and uncarbonated beverages. The mACS also fill cans of varying heights and diameters – from 163 mL to 568 mL in volume – and the changeover between cans can be done in less than 30 minutes. 

“The mACS,” says Cask founder Peter Love, “gives brewers the ability to create new revenue streams and beverages. They can quickly shift to new can sizes for current products, or jump from beer and cider to soft drinks and uncarbonated beverages such as cold brew coffee, wine and energy drinks.” 

Dead Armadillo Craft Brewing (Tulsa, Oklahoma) is now using the mACS to can its beer and a new product.

“When you add a liquid nitrogen doser to the mACS,” says Todd Phillips, Dead Armadillo’s Director of Operations, “you can use it to can coffee. So after many months of R&D, we’re entering the nitro cold-brewed coffee market with some friends at a local coffee roaster. It’s a brave new world for us that wouldn’t have been possible without Cask.”

“The mACS supports a larger array of can sizes than any line we have ever seen,” Phillips adds, “and we can change from can sizes, lid formats, and product types with minimal effort.” See the brewery’s mACS in action:  http://www.cask.com/2018/02/dead-armadillo-takes-beer-macs/

The mACS  has electric cam-driven seamers, three CO2 pre-purge heads, three fill heads, and a post-fill rinser and dryer. It measures just 7 by 2.5 feet and has a very small footprint of 17.5 square feet. It has a recipe memory feature that automatically sets the fill settings for speedy transition between different beverages.

The mACS conveyor belt can feeder (as found on Cask’s larger ACS machine) allows for adding such automated pre- and post-packaging components as a depalletizer, inline date coder, nitrogen doser, pressure-sensitive labeler, shrink sleever and other components.

“Since it can be equipped with an array of automated components,” Love says, “the mACS also enables our customers to scale up the automation of their canning process as they grow and diversify.”

The machine’s unique filler technology combines fill-level sensors with proprietary foam-control valves.  Those features produce filled cans with extremely low dissolved oxygen pickup of just 5-20 parts per billion — better or comparable to large-scale and much more expensive canning and bottling lines.

The mACS fills 20+ cans per minute and 50+ cases per hour with just one operator.

Get more details and see the mACS package cold-brewed coffee at http://www.cask.com/2017/12/meet-macs-micro-cannings-most-flexible-system/


CAMRA to embrace kegged and canned 'quality' beer

CAMRA to embrace ‘quality’ kegged and canned beer

The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) is set to widen its remit to represent drinkers of quality beers, ciders and perries of all types, as well as moving its focus beyond traditional pubs, if its members approve recommendations put before them in April

 

We’ll have some updated news and opinions soon but first we wanted to share the press release as soon as we can in full that advocates that CAMRA, as part of its far-reaching Revitalisation, it will embrace ‘quality’ beer and not just real ale.

STARTS

The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) is set to widen its remit to represent drinkers of quality beers, ciders and perries of all types, as well as moving its focus beyond traditional pubs, if its members approve recommendations put before them in April.

While continuing to advocate that real ale is the pinnacle of the brewer’s craft, the Campaign’s wider focus will mean all drinkers who enjoy a range of beers, ciders and perries will feel welcome in the organisation.

If the changes are approved, the Campaign will work to provide an enhanced education and information experience for its members, and all drinkers who attend CAMRA festivals, to help them appreciate and learn about all types and styles of beer, cider and perry – and make informed decisions about what constitutes “quality”.

While campaigning for the continued production and consumption of real ale, cider and perry will remain at the core of CAMRA’s objectives, members will be asked to consider changes to the organisation’s Articles of Association which will widen the range of types of beer that it represents – including quality beer which does not meet the organisation’s definition of “real ale”.

The recommendations also propose that as a result of widening its scope of interest CAMRA will be able to represent and engage with all beer drinkers and with all pubgoers, irrespective of what they choose to drink, increasing its ability to campaign in the interests of a much larger constituency.

This broadening of consumer representation will also see CAMRA demonstrate an interest in and lobby for a much wider range of on-trade outlets. While the organisation will continue to campaign for the preservation of the traditional British pub, it will also encourage on-trade outlets of all kinds to serve quality beer, cider and perry. CAMRA will continue to advocate drinking in public social venues, rather than the increasing practise of consumers buying their drinks from supermarkets for home consumption.

The proposed changes may take the form of:

  • CAMRA festivals offering a wider range of quality beers, ciders and perries in all formats

  • CAMRA engaging with drinkers of all types – with the hope of taking them on a ‘journey of discovery’ of why real ale, cider and perry is particularly special

  • CAMRA supporting members in their appreciation of beer, their ability to both recognise quality products and campaign effectively for them to be stocked in pubs and bars

  • CAMRA providing information about all kinds of beer, not just real ale, as well as opportunities for members to learn more about brewing and the different types and styles available to drinkers

  • CAMRA recognising a wider range of drinks and establishments in its local and national competitions

The 46-year-old consumer organisation launched a root and branch review of its purpose and objectives, called the Revitalisation Project, at the start of 2016. CAMRA’s 190,000 members have been involved and consulted throughout the process and will soon have their say on whether the resulting proposals for change are adopted.

Seeking approval for their recommendations, the Campaign’s leadership argue that a wider appeal and closer connection with the current revolution in beer and bars will enable the organisation to connect with modern-day beer drinkers and pub goers. This in turn will strengthen CAMRA’s campaigning voice: enabling it to increase the already-considerable influence it exerts on the Government and industry decision-makers.

CAMRA chairman Colin Valentine said: “It’s always been important that our members have had a say throughout this review process and we’re now at the point where we’ll be giving all our members the chance to vote on the final Revitalisation Project recommendations.

“The vote will be held at our Annual General Meeting, in Coventry in April. In the months between now and then we’ll be making sure members can access the full details of the changes we’re recommending, along with the analysis of the impacts and potential opportunities the changes will have.

“My colleagues and I will be making ourselves available at meetings around the country over the next three months so that members can ask us questions about the proposed changes. We’ll also be making sure that we’re available online at frequent intervals. At the end of this process our aim is to make sure that every member has been given the opportunity to learn more about the proposals before they voted.

“Our recommendations mark an important stage in CAMRA’s long history. We recognise that the beer and pub landscape has changed and continues to evolve, and our place in that landscape has changed as well. We’re determined to make sure that we continue to change and evolve so that we are relevant to drinkers of all types and continue to offer a compelling reason for people to join our organisation.”

ENDS